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Bulletproofing Web Applications

Adam Kolawa

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Top Stories by Adam Kolawa

Garbage in, garbage out - it's an axiom that applies to many aspects of enterprise development, but none more so than building reliable and robust Web applications and integration projects with XML. Since its inception, XML has been seen as the cure-all for every problem related to Web application development. However, poorly written XML can either slow down an integration project, or worse, cause the integration project to collapse. It's important to understand some of the inefficiencies of XML, as well as how you can "clean up" and prevent the use of poorly written XML in development projects. After all, system performance is only as good as the data received and the instructions given. If errors are contained in the XML, it is more likely than not that the system will crash. One of the main benefits of XML is that it provides mechanisms for verifying document val... (more)

Why Build Development Tools for Linux?

I was introduced to Linux in 1992, when the first version was available. At the time I was visiting Poland and my company was building an inventory control system. One of our partners had decided to use Linux to run their inventory system. What led them to use this little-known operating system for a critical task such as inventory control? Basically, they determined that it was their only viable option. DOS did not meet their needs for scalability and stability. Unix would have served their needs, but it was simply too expensive for them at the time. They had heard that Linux o... (more)

It's Time to Prevent Poorly-Written XML

Since its inception XML has at times been seen as the cure-all for every problem related to Web applications and integration projects. However, poorly written XML can either slow down an integration project, or worse, cause the integration project to collapse. When developing integration systems such as Web services or any other business-to-business function, developers may encounter the following problems when writing XML: Non-verifiable code - XML is supposed to be easily validated by use of Document Type Definitions (DTDs) or schemas. Frequently however, DTDs and schemas may... (more)

SOA Best Practices - Four Steps to Securing Your Web Services

Dr Adam Kolowa (pictured), Founder & CEO of Parasoft and panelist at SYS-CON Events'  "SOA Web Services Power Panel" at SOA Web Services Edge Conference & Expo - June 5-6, 2006 - in New York City, writes: Security has the inherent nature of spanning many different layers of a Web Services system. Web Services vulnerabilities can be present in the operating system, the network, the database, the Web server, the application server, the XML parser, the Web Services implementation stack, the application code, the XML firewall, the Web Service monitoring or management appliance, or just... (more)

SOA & Web Services - Is It Done Yet?

It's difficult to determine how much time to spend reviewing and testing your code before checking it in to the team's shared code base. On the one hand, you want to complete and check in code as rapidly as possible so you can meet deadlines and move on to developing new code or getting started on other projects. After all, you went into software development to develop, not to test. Yet, if you move too fast, you might end up checking in code that causes bugs-immediately upon integration, or later on when the code is reused, extended, or maintained. In that case, any time that y... (more)